Housing Credit Resident Stories

Since 1986, the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (Housing Credit) has financed the development or preservation of 3.3 million affordable homes and served 8 million low-income households, including veterans of the armed forces, families with children, senior citizens, individuals with disabilities, and low-wage workers. Below are just some examples of residents whose lives have been changed for the better by the Housing Credit.

Veteran Housing

Family Housing

Senior Housing

Stories by State

Florida

Brenda Montalvo

Brenda Montalvo, a single mother of two children, was struggling to pay rising rents in Miami. She eventually found Southpoint Crossing Apartments, where she was able to not only provide a safe home for her children but also join a community fostered by other residents. To read more about Brenda, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

Ricky Fitzpatrick

Ricky Fitzpatrick is a military veteran who was living near Miami when he was the victim of a drive-by shooting. The resulting injuries took Ricky out of the workforce. His friends connected him with Harvard House Apartments in North Miami Beach, FL where he found a home. To read more about Ricky, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

Bill and Grether Ginorio

Grether and Bill Ginorio’s life took a devastating turn when a surgery went wrong and Grether fell ill. They sold their home and moved to their daughter’s home in Mississippi. When Grether unexpectedly recovered her health, the couple was without a home or an income other than Bill’s small veteran pension. They eventually landed at Tequesta Knolls Apartments in Miami Beach, FL. To read more about Bill and Grether, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

Georgia

Walter Littlejohn

Walter Littlejohn is a proud Atlanta native and father to three children. In the early 2000s, however, Walter’s mental health became dangerous when he attempted suicide. When he moved into a home at Phoenix House in Atlanta, GA, he was able to establish his independence and regain his mental health. To read more about Walter, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

Denise Miller

Denise Miller is a former nursery school teacher who lost both her mother and brother in 2012. Unable to process her loss, she turned to drugs and alcohol, eventually losing her job and becoming homeless. One of her counselors at a homeless shelter recommended Phoenix House, where Denise found a home and has continued to receive the support she needs. To read more about Denise, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

Iowa

Tiffany Hunter

Tiffany Hunter and her four children were devastated by catastrophic floods in 2018. With only a backpack of belongings each, they had to start from scratch. They found a three-bedroom home at Chapel Ridge West Apartments in West Des Moines and now Tiffany can use more of her income to take care of her children. To read more about Tiffany, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

Miranda Jordan

Miranda Jordan, a certified nurse’s assistant, was struggling to make ends meet when she had her son, Victor. Out of the workforce to raise Victor, Miranda was diagnosed with fibromyalgia and struggling with her mental health. When she and her son moved into a unit at Castlewood Apartments, she felt like she could breathe again. To read more about Miranda, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

Kentucky

Tanece Carr

Bill Marinelli, a talented pianist and veteran, settled his life down in Foxborough, MA. When a developer bought his bungalow for its land, Bill found himself without a home. Bill resorted to living out of his car, surviving bitter winters with two sleeping bags. With help from his friends, Bill eventually found a safe, affordable home at Paul Hazelton House in Saco, ME. To read more about Bill, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

Maine

Bill Marinelli

Bill Marinelli, a talented pianist and veteran, settled his life down in Foxborough, MA. When a developer bought his bungalow for its land, Bill found himself without a home. Bill resorted to living out of his car, surviving bitter winters with two sleeping bags. With help from his friends, Bill eventually found a safe, affordable home at Paul Hazelton House in Saco, ME. To read more about Bill, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

Maryland

Theora Beckman

Theora Beckman is a Maryland native who, when her grown children moved out and her retirement was fast approaching, realized she could no longer afford to live in her four-bedroom home. She found a new home at Mountainview Apartments, an affordable senior community in Cumberland, MD where she can comfortably cover her rent with social security income. To read more about Theora, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

James Bowen Jr.

James Bowen Jr. moved to Maryland to help take care of his girlfriend’s father’s house, but found himself without a home when her father decided to return. James found Mountainview Apartments where he lived until his father, battling cancer, needed a full-time caretaker. He enjoys being an active member of the community there, where he became Vice President of the Tenants Association. To read more about James, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

Ohio

Beverly “Jeanie” Jean Borden

Beverly “Jeanie” Jean Borden had a thriving career at a CAP agency. When her family, including her parents and her sisters, became ill, Beverly retired early to take care of them full time. She feared homelessness after those responsibilities ended, but found a permanent home at the Renaissance Apartments in downtown Toledo. To read more about Beverly, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

Robert Kiss

Robert Kiss had settled into a comfortable life in Ohio with a family of his own and a career as an exterminator. With long hours, hard physical work, and old age, both the job and home maintenance became too difficult. Through his veteran’s support network, Robert found a home at Kirby Manor in Cleveland, OH. To read more about Robert, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

Pennsylvania

Randi Horst

Randi Horst was a single mother of two children when her grandmother was unexpectedly and permanently moved to a nursing home. Randi, who had been her grandmother’s caretaker, found herself pregnant with a third child and without a home. She eventually found an affordable home at Sassafras Terrace Apartments in Mt. Joy, PA. To read more about Randi, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

South Carolina

Vivianna Harrison

Vivianna Harrison was sharing one bedroom with her two children in her mother’s home when she decided it was time to become independent. Her journey toward independence began at Belton Woods, where she learned money management skills and found a job in healthcare. She now lives in her own mobile home. To read more about Vivianna, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

Texas

Charles Lockman

Charles Lockman is a U.S. Army veteran residing at the Travis Street Plaza in Houston, TX, a development that provides a service-enriched permanent housing community targeted to very low-income, homeless, and disabled veterans in Houston. After opening its doors in December 2012, Travis Street Plaza reached full occupancy in July 2013. Charles credits his affordable home with his ability to become a productive citizen again.

Virginia

Saifullah Khan and Fnu Faizullah

In 2002, brothers and Afghanistan natives Saifullah and Fnu began working for the United States Army as linguists while they were still in high school. By 2012, the job had become too dangerous for them and they escaped to start new lives in the U.S. with their families. They eventually found homes at Hazel Hill Apartments in Fredericksburg, VA. The brothers have earned Associate’s Degrees and are now both studying to become doctors. To read more about Saifullah, click here. To read more about Fnu, click here. To see more stories from the National Housing Trust’s Voices Out Loud series, click here.

How can we serve more residents?

There is a great and growing need for affordable homes in the United States. Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, nearly 11 million renter households were spending more than half of their income on rent. Today, joblessness has reached historic levels as millions of workers have lost their livelihoods or had their wages reduced due to the crisis, and many impacted renters are likely to become housing cost-burdened if they were not already. Meanwhile, there is a growing need for affordable housing: For every 100 extremely low-income households, there are only 36 affordable homes available, according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition. As the affordable housing shortage grows, the Housing Credit will be needed more than ever.

By expanding and strengthening the Housing Credit, we could serve even more low-income households across the country. The Affordable Housing Credit Improvement Act could provide over 600,000 additional affordable homes, and Housing Credit and Private Activity Bond provisions within the Moving Forward Act could provide more than 1 million additional affordable homes. Housing Credit provisions are also needed in response to the COVID-19 crisis. To learn more about our the AHTCC’s priorities, click here, and contact us to get involved.